Thursday, November 26, 2009

Gratitude

Thank you.

Two words, millions of feelings.

A blog post about giving thanks might seem trite this time of year, but sometimes trite is necessary. Just like taking the time to tell your wife "I Love You" while on vacation in Jamaica; sometimes the little gestures reinforce the obvious.

I know I don't tell the people that matter thank you enough.

I say it to the cashier at the supermarket, to strangers who hold the door open for me. When I change lanes, sometimes I say "thank you" to the people who let me in. But, I realized the other day that I don't say it enough to my wife, my family or, most importantly, to God.

But, it's not just the frequency, it's the feelings behind the words that are important as well.

A rushed "thank you" to God while I drive to work is really sad. A sarcastic "thank you" to my wife after she's spent all day running after our children is quite stupid. Gratitude is in the heart and while human beings have designated two words as our way of expressing gratitude, it's our actions that do the real speaking.

How grateful am I for the life I lead? To who do I express my gratitude? Am I taking my blessings for granted?

All of us should ask ourselves these questions regularly and we should give thanks just as often. It shouldn't take a special Thursday in November for us to express gratitude.

That's an everyday thing.






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3 comments:

Deacon Blue said...

Indeed. Something I don't remind myself to do...or remember to do...nearly often enough.

Brenda said...

This is something that I've been working within myself for the past few weeks. Turning my attention from what I don't seem to have and instead focus on the wonderful things that I do have in my life.

LightWorker said...

"But, it's not just the frequency, it's the feelings behind the words that are important as well.

"A rushed "thank you" to God while I drive to work is really sad."

Gratitude is, after all, a state of mind. The words spoken merely allow others in on that state, otherwise they serve little purpose, except maybe to prime the pump to bring forth that grateful state.

Notwithstanding, words do have creative powers, as do thoughts and deeds.

People talk to me all the time, sharing their life experiences. I don't solicit these outpourings, they're given gratis.

I'm in the grocery checker line. And the man in front of me begin to discuss Thanksgiving, and what he had to be thankful for.

He was on hard times. Recently he lost his Social Security, and some other safety net things, but he was still grateful, and still gave to those less fortunate than he.

A few days ago, he brought crackers and peanut butter to a homeless man he'd befriended, and knowing what the Bible stated about giving and receiving, he knew he was in line for a blessing.

Looking up, he imitated what he had done, and repeated what he had said at the time: "Okay, God, now it's your turn."

On his way back home, riding his bike, he saw something green in the bushes. He stopped, and went back, and plucked a twenty dollar bill, a little worse for wear, from the vegetation.

He was now in line to buy a book of stamps. He handed the woman a twenty dollar bill.

Giving opens the windows of heaven, and multiple blessings can be had this way.

Now, I don't suggest that we do what the man I'm referencing did, do the giving for the receiving, but it didn't seem to hurt his cause at all.

@Brenda: "Turning my attention from what I don't seem to have and instead focus on the wonderful things that I do have in my life."

Good for you. Being faithful over a few things qualify us to be faithful over many things. And him that hath shall receive, because we're focusing now on what we have, and shall receive, rather than on what we don't have, and don't receive.

Our state of mind is everything. It's what we're being at any given time. And what're being consistently, we manifest into our world.

Raving Black Lunatic